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When I Grow Too OId To Dream - Linda Ronstadt - Living In The USA (8-Track Cartridge, Album)

Album Living in the USA. And when I grow too old to dream Living in the USA Linda Ronstadt. 1. Back in the U.S.A. 2. When I Grow Too Old to Dream. Linda Ronstadt recorded the song on her album Living in the USA and performed the song on an episode of The Muppet Show. A segment of "When I Grow Too Old to Dream" is used in the chorus of the song "Too Old To Dream" on O'Hooley & Tidow's album Silent June (). Jul 02,  · Linda Ronstadt My Blog is here. arenhatdypenni.pleadincarcurecudicnervlogribotu.co

There is nothing - no clever arrangement, no snappy guitar hook or intro, no guest star harmonizing to draw your attention away from The Voice for an instant. When she sings "Ooh Baby Baby" in an arrangement patterned after the Miracles' original harmony chartthe backup vocals fade into the distance like a weak radio signal. Ronstadt is so far forward in the mix that you can hear her breathing softly at the end of each phrase, in and out. The strategy makes sense. The sound of Ronstadt's Album) is the key to her commercial appeal even more than the songs she sings.

Her techniques - the smooth, deadpan phrasing; the catch and sob; the double endings that build to a dramatic crescendo on the second go-round - are borrowed from folk and country music traditions.

Placed in a '70s pop context, these mannerisms make Ronstadt's singing as comforting as a butcher-block table in a chrome-and-plastic kitchen. Rustic functionalism has become decorative nostalgia. Living in the U. Ronstadt tackles soul, rock 'n roll, contemporary songwriters, even musical comedy numbers.

It's as if she's answering all the critics who've pegged her as the Peter Asherized kid. Asher is still producer, but he, Ronstadt and her band have dumped anything that might be construed as a production gimmick the band looms Grand Canyons away Album) her voice in favor of uncluttered simplicity. Song Genres. All Genres. Song Styles. All Styles. Song Moods. All Moods. Song Themes. All Themes. Linda Ronstadt. Living in the U. Collector's Edition. Original Album Series.

Linda Ronstadt Living in the U. And the other song that confesses to abject depression, "All That You Dream," both ends positively and is couched throughout in an exotic, passionate musical idiom that denies weakness from the outset.

Otherwise, the songs here are exultant, intensely personal, overtly erotic or simply tender- which is pretty much the emotional range one has come to expect from a Linda Ronstadt record.

The album's ten songs can be divided evenly between covers of older material and contemporary numbers, and in every case but two direct comparisons can be made either to the original or to the best-known interpretation. Apparently there was a good deal of experimentation in the studio as to just how to sing it and with what arrangement.

The solution was an extremely spare combination of Don Grolnick's consoling, patiently plodding piano chords hardly adjectives that normally characterize the work of one of the finest, most stylistically wide-ranging pianists ever to play in a rock band and the eerie overlay of Mike Mainieri's vibes. Against this Linda sings the song about as "straight" as she can, "reading right from the lead sheet," as she put it. The result is interesting but not entirely successful. The arrangement serves to defuse the song of its latent sentimentality, and its coldness perhaps underscores the feelings of loss inherent in the lyrics cf.

But without the sentimentality the song seems a bit foursquare. And Linda's singing is slightly reminiscent of her version of "Blue Bayou" another interpretation I didn't much like in its alternation of low soft singing with high loud singing. Ronstadt went through a period a couple of years ago in concert of overdoing the dramatic effect of shifting suddenly from quiet to loud and back again. Here the bottom part of the voice seems pressed just a bit lower in pitcb than is comfortable for her, and the loud singing sounds forced in comparison to what a trained operatic voice could accomplish with this same music.

Still, the interpretation is an undeniably interesting one, and the commercial success of "Blue Bayou" proved that a lot of people like just what gives me pause in her singing. It doesn't appeal to me particularly as a song, but it's sweet enough, and Linda sings it with a nice delicacy better than Elvis did, with his sagging pitch.

Some may find this the most obvious instance on the album of Linda's supposed predilection for sentimentality. For me, the singing is honorable enough in itself, and once again a sparse, telling arrangement avoids all hint of goo. Waddy Wachtel plays guitar and contributes decent harmony singing, and Grolnick's sustained but light-textured organ in the choruses sounds elegiac.

Linda cuts Presley's first verse and repeats the chorus at the end, changing words slightly but in no important way from Presley's original. Chuck Berry's "Back in the U. Linda's cover falls right about in the middle of her other versions of rock and rhythm-and-blues from this era. The vocal is nicely energetic, and the band matches Berry's arrangement, with Grolnick doing a lovely job of invoking Johnny Johnson's original piano part.

Linda's version does without the doo-wop "uh-uh-uh's" and "oh yeah's" that fill up the gaps in the original, which she and her collaborators found dated, and replaces Berry's fadeout with a not-all-that-interesting coda.

The singing provides a decent example of Ronstadt's way of coarsening her naturally "clean" vocal production when she feels the need to project a tougher persona- as on the syllables "God," "box" in "jukebox" and the second "I'm" in the phrase "I'm so glad.

What's missing in this "Back in the U. In a live performance of the song in May of at the Oakland Coliseum, just after they'd recorded it, Linda's band launched into the music at breakneck speed and maintained it throughout. Album) apologized later for the tempo, but it lent the proceedings a hectically improvisatory quality that is preferable to the stiffness of the recorded version. The stiffness is suggested by Linda's precise flatting of the tag-syllables on the ends of key lines "-way" in "runaway," "A.

Berry flats the same syllables, but it's done casually, as a sexy accent, rather than deliberately. With Linda it sounds calculated and rote. No doubt some Smokey Robinson loyalists won't be able to accept her version of the former. As a pure piece of singing, Robinson's version of this song surpasses Linda's.

First, there's the whole issue of the erotic symbolism of the male soprano, a symbolism that has operated with infallible effect since the days of the great operatic castrati in the 17th and 18th centuries. The ethereal sexual yearning of Robinson's voice makes an inevitably different and more distinctive impression than a woman in the same register, especially when combined with his odd but endearing prissiness of enunciation.

In addition, Robinson's singing is full of little felicities that heighten the sexual ambience- the delicious hesitation on the second "baby" in the first line of the third chorus, for instance, or the wonderful little ornamental quivers on the words "believe" and "here" in the third verse, or the magical phrasing of "mistakes too I'm" in the second verse. It's the performance of a man at the very end of his sexual tether.

But in a smoother, more luxuriant, more sexually fulfilled way, Linda's version works too, and it could very well become a wonderful AM radio make-out song. Like Robinson, Linda makes a fine effect with the switching between a breathy, erotic natural voice and falsetto. And what distinguishes her arrangement from Robinson's is the use of David Sanborn's saxophone, especially as it blends with Ronstadt's vocal coloration in words like "pay" in the first verse an even more telling instance of that blend comes with the final syllable in the song "Alison," in which Sanborn's sax emerges as if from within Linda's last falsetto note.

I've already indicated Album) feelings about Ronstadt vs. Doris Troy on "Just One Look"- I think Linda's version is superior on every count, and not just because she has the better voice. What Troy does offer is a tough, gospelisb blackness of enunciation and phrasing, but I for one don't think that's a necessary ingredient of the song; and Linda's white predatory-female protagonist is fully appropriate.

Furthermore, her band plays better and is far better recorded, and the arrangement builds subtly with the addition of tambourine and cowbell, both played by Asher. To cite just one further nicety in the coda that Ronstadt et al. Whether or not Souther can finally achieve a viable performing career, be has certainly found a rare interpreter in Ronstadt. The music of this song boasts a fine melody and a host of exquisitely crafted subsidiary details, and the lyrics, too, seem rich and evocative, especially the full title phrase, "Black roses, white rhythm and blues.

That phrase in Souther's song will strike some as unspecific, as will the title of Warren Zevon's "Mohammed's Radio. The arrangement is spare yet telling in the best manner of her past two albums, with another of those autumnal, slow-moving organ lines that reinforce the slightly chill, lonely feeling of much of the disc as a whole, and a restrained pedal steel guitar part from Dan Dugmore.

Linda's singing, apart from her general sympathy for Souther's music and its idiom, is full of lovely touches. The enunciation on the word "lose," to take one tiny example, is a classic case of the Americanness of her accent.

The yearning sound of the voice being let out on words like "stay," "whole," and "your eyes" are typical examples of Ronstadt's command of balladic rhetoric. And her own background singing at the end, merging with Wachtel's electric guitar on the repeated phrase "Black roses," makes a magical effect.

The only reservation I have is the falsetto on the line "I don't know what else I can do. But it doesn't sound very attractive to me, even though it's handled tidily enough from a technical standpoint. The best-known version of this song is Bonnie Raitt's which Linda says she's never heard, even though the two women are friendsand most rock critics of the sort I've been referring to throughout this essay think of Raitt as a positive corrective to all the faults they perceive in Ronstadt- in fact, the several critics with whom I've spoken about Living in the U.

Raitt sings in her usual warm, direct, honest manner; for her the song becomes a consoling, rolling anthem. She achieves this by her tendency to elide lines and words, chopping short one note and hurrying on to the next; by the repetition of the chorus at the end; by an arrangement full of sustained strings and French horns and by a production that turns the harmonies of Emmylou Harris, Jackson Browne, and Souther into a small chorus and blurs their individuality in the process.

Next to this, Linda's account may sound tense and rigid. The arrangement is far sparser, beginning with an eerie pedal steel effect from Dugmore and full of odd, distancing touches, such as the dabs of conga-drum color that Russ Kunkel occasionally applies. Linda's singing fits this mold. It is tight and self-contained, with what sounds like a greater amount of echo although that may be partly a psychological illusion.

The song in this version is no anthem at all, but a series of isolated phrases, cold and distant. Yet in two ways Raitt's version is more austere than Ronstadt's. She sings the recurrent word "shadows" in the chorus on a high C which drops to the F a fifth below. This is an extremely stark effect, hardly softened by the quick G grace-note that she interposes before she actually reaches the F.

Ronstadt sings both an A and a G on her way down from C, puts more weight on those notes and holds them longer. The result is altogether softer, and more conventional. If the unusualness of the precipitous C-to-F drop in Raitt's version seems preferable, Ronstadt's switch to "you" at the end is more controversial. Ronstadt's detractors may well complain that this is yet another instance of her failure to comprehend an abstract or cosmic metaphor unless it's reduced to the most immediate personal terms, But it seems to me that in switching from "shadows" to "you" as the agent of the protagonist's despair, Linda keeps the more universal implications of "shadows" and achieves a powerful dramatic effect in the sudden personification.

The device is precisely the same as Neil Young's abrupt shift to the personal in his "Cortez the Killer. But for me Ronstadt has by far the more distinctive voice, and the coldness and agony of her version strike closer to the essence of the song. That essence is reinforced by all sorts of details in the phrasing, from the hymnlike inflection of the line, "My life has lost its mystery," to the desperation and passion of the full-voiced attacks on syllables like "wild" and the "sha-" in "shadows.

Linda Ronstadt is not often thought of as an intellectual singer, and perhaps the process by which this version evolved was intuitive. But as an interpretation it's downright smart. The performance of Little Feat's "All That You Dream" by both her and the band not only far surpasses the original, but ranks among their finest efforts.

Little Feat's recording is only functionally sung and not very interestingly arranged. Ronstadt sings the song with an exact yet unstudied command of pitch especially important with this song's highly chromatic vocal line and tough, defiant persona. The toughness is reinforced by several devices- the familiar growls, slurred diction and precise touches of vocal color here and there, as in the switch to falsetto on the word "you" and the tendency to let sustained notes shift through several changes of vowel-sound most impressively on the final syllable of the word "everyone".

The highlight of the arrangement is Dan Dugmore's pedal steel guitar break, the closest to progressive synthesizer-rock that a Ronstadt song has ever come. This leaves two more songs, and they may very well be the ones that provoke the most vituperation in reviews by critics who see in Ronstadt the antithesis of all that is strong and rebellious and macho in the best new rock. And quite apart from their stances within the polemics of lates rock, there is the question of whether this particular song should be sung by a woman.

As far as the first issue is concerned, all I can say is that Linda's version works for me. Costello doesn't actually sing the song very well, although admittedly this ballad's mere existence within the rest of his repertory, which is heavily weighted toward uptempo rockers, makes its own kind of statement.

Of course Costello fans could argue that polished singing is beside the point; "Alison" is indeed partly a matter of the projection of an attitude through phrasing and inflection.

But it's also a beautifully crafted song, both in lyrics and music- which Costello will surely admit when he calms down. As might be expected, Linda's singing and the arrangement especially the interaction with Sanborn are elegantly shaped. What's surprising is the punkish aptness of her phrasing, which manages to echo Costello she didn't really feel she understood the song until she experienced the full impact of Costello as a performer at a concert at Hollywood High and add something of her own.

But what of her own? In Costello's version the song makes clear if emotionally complex sense, as a song from a man to a woman he has loved, now sees as superficial but deep down loves still. Costello's own guardedness about overt tenderness fits the singer's persona ideally- the song's rich sentiment owes much to its very refusal to be sentimental. But Linda is not only a woman, she has very often pushed the element of sentiment in her music to the point that many of her detractors consider her a hopeless sentimentalist.

I have generally found her sentiment to be unsentimental which no doubt means that I am a sentimentalist myselfso that aspect of her "Alison" doesn't bother me. But it did take me a long time to get used to the idea of a woman singing this song. It can only reach its full emotional depth when the intensity of the protagonist's feelings toward Alison becomes fully manifest. It would seem hard to understand a woman singer's barely contained feeling for Alison unless the woman were herself deeply in love with her.

But that seems to imply a bisexual love triangle, which not only needlessly complicates an already complex song, but introduces a disconcerting lesbian element into Linda's public image the combination of a commanding voice and girlish charm has indeed won her a good many gay women fans.

Here is one case in which knowing a performer can be helpful in purely aesthetic appreciation. After a long and vilorous explanation from Linda as to how she conceived the song and what she thought of intense friendship between women, and even an analysis of the particular woman friend she had in mind as Alison- an aggressive, insecure, selfish, generous, and beautiful young girl who in her own way is very much a punk- it's begun to make sense.

There are some who simply don't bother about such questions of persona in the first place. But for those of us who do, "Alison" not only now seems logical in Linda's version, but far more appropriate for her than, say, Lowell George's "Willin'" from Heart Like a Wheel or "Carmelita" from Simple Dreams.

Which brings us, finally, to Zevon's "Mohammed's Radio. It represents not only an overpowering piece of singing and an inspired arrangement both far truer to the song than Zevon himself can muster, but also the first time Linda has attempted with sovereign success a song that transcends the humanistic, amorous-psychological basis of her music and moves into the realm of metaphorical abstraction.

Yet her detractors think her version of "Mohamned's Radio" is one-dimensional and uncomprehending, with the metaphorical implications of the lyrics reduced to their most obvious and trivial meanings. It should be inserted here that my feelings about the song are conditioned in part from having heard it several times during her August,tour.

Although Linda says she far prefers working in the studio to singing on stage, it often happens that her live versions of songs just recorded improve during the subsequent tour. That certainly happened with "Tumbling Dice," as documented in the live performance on the FM soundtrack, and it makes her and Asher's continued resistance to a live album debatable. Still, the disc version is fine enough, and it's hard once again to avoid the notion that those who can't appreciate it are the victims of their own preconceptions.

Linda Ronstadt is known as a singer of boy-girl homilies; therefore it's impossible she could tackle a song like this with any perception. Reinforcing that bias is another problem.

All four of the people whom I know to dislike her "Mohammed's Radio" are in some way associated with Rolling Stone in New York, and in an interview for that magazine she analyzed the song in words that were more breezy than profound. Her tone may have made her critics even more convinced than before that for her this song is simply a little ditty about listening to rock on the radio.

But to me she's talked with some fluency about the song's multiple meanings. And in any case, one has to pull back from preconceptions and behind-the-scenes information and simply listen to what one hears. The devices artists use to make their art are just that- devices. The fact that Maria Callas talked inarticulately about the characters she portrayed hardly detracts from her status as the greatest operatic actress of the century, nor does Beetboven's peculiar brooding about his nephew compromise his music's universality.

Even if Linda does use her own psychological tools to get inside a song- even if she approaches the abstract through the personal- that hardly matters if the result is as overwhelming as it is here. As with "White Rhythm and Blues," the words of "Mohammed's Radio" may not be susceptible to precise analysis- in fact, were such analysis possible, the song might well seem unevocative- and yet may still strike one as emotionally true.

This song is about the redemptive power of rock and roll. But it's also about rock as escapism, about the place of blacks within a white culture, about mystical religion and the driving force of the irrational beneath society's troubled surface, Album). Linda's version works so well in part because of the minimal role that ironic inflection plays in this particular song and in part because of the primary function of music in determining the essence of any song. In "Mohammed's Radio" the multiple meanings are inherent in the words, and in the relationship between the words and music, rather than a function of the singer's delivery.

What makes opera and song such a complex and fertile business is this When I Grow Too OId To Dream - Linda Ronstadt - Living In The USA (8-Track Cartridge interchange. Music is both the deepest and most emotionally intense of the arts; independent of words it is rarely successful as a medium for wit and irony. Words lack music's emotional power but can be far more focused; the combination of words and music, then, can function as a dialectically potent artistic marriage. Richard Wagner, who articulated many of these ideas in his theoretical works and then realized them in his music dramas, liked to link words with the masculine principle and music with the feminine.

A singer can freight the words with still further layers of complexity by way of vocal color and inflection. And thus a woman already linked archetypally with emotion, if you're a Jungian or Wagnerian who sings can tap profound depths beneath our everyday existences. If the woman in question is already one whose whole life revolves around emotion, you begin to get some hint of the wellsprings of Linda Ronstadt's appeal.

In the past, however, she has sometimes bad trouble with songs in which a composer-interpreter's vocal personality has been an essential ingredient of the song, or if the song has had a heavy component of irony built into both the words and their potential interpretation.

For both these reasons perhaps the all-time least successful Ronstadt cover version was her account of Randy Newman's "Sail Away" on her Don't Cry Now album of Some critics find hints of a mordant irony on Zevon's part in "Mohammed's Radio" that make the passionate directness of Ronstadt's performance seem misconceived- above all his very use of the word "alas. Besides, Zevon's voice and singing style, while effective enough for emphatic rockers, are far too limited to suggest much subtlety. The same critics see a real ambivalence on the part of the Zevon protagonist: He recognizes the redemptive power of music but simultaneously distances himself from it, especially in the "village idiot" stanza, in which rock seems to have reduced its devotees to escapist vegetables.

This may well be part of the song, but for me it's more of an accent than a central meaning. In any event Linda recognizes this particular ambivalence very clearly, and has even heightened its ambiguity by two minor textual alterations.

Find album reviews, stream songs, credits and award information for Living in the U.S.A. - Linda Ronstadt on AllMusic - - On Living in the U.S.A., Linda Ronstadt made the. Create your own version of When I Grow Too Old To Dream as made famous by Linda Ronstadt. Choose the instruments you want to hear, and download your version instantly! When I Grow Too Old To Dream - Linda Ronstadt - Custom Backing Track MP3 Living Next Door To Alice. Smokie. £ If You Can't Give Me Love. Suzi Quatro/5(15). When I Grow Too Old to Dream. Linda Ronstadt. From the Album Living In The USA out of 5 stars 3 ratings. Listen Now Buy song $ out of 5 stars When I Grow too Old. " Linda Ronstadt. Reviewed in the United States on September 21, Verified Purchase.5/5(3).

Song information for When I Grow Too Old to Dream - Linda Ronstadt on AllMusic.

Linda Ronstadt. Linda Marie Ronstadt (born July 15, ) is an American popular music recording artist. She has earned eleven Grammy Awards, two Academy of Country Music awards, an Emmy Award, an ALMA Award, numerous United States and internationally certified gold, platinum and multiplatinum albums, in addition to Tony Award and Golden Globe nominations. Linda Ronstadt sang "When I Grow Too Old to Dream" to Kermit on The Muppet Show episode Linda Ronstadt had previously recorded this classic movie song on her album Living in the USA. A clip of the number was used at the climax of the special The Muppets: A Celebration of 30 Years.

Discover releases, reviews, credits, songs, and more about Linda Ronstadt - Living In The USA at Discogs. Complete your Linda Ronstadt collection.

Song information for When I Grow Too Old to Dream - Linda Ronstadt on AllMusic. Discover releases, reviews, credits, songs, and more about Linda Ronstadt - Living In The USA at Discogs. Complete your Linda Ronstadt collection.

View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the SP - Specialty Pressing, Gatefold Vinyl release of Living In The USA on Discogs.


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9 Replies to “ When I Grow Too OId To Dream - Linda Ronstadt - Living In The USA (8-Track Cartridge, Album) ”

  • View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the 8-Track Cartridge release of Living In The USA on Discogs.
  • Album Living in the USA. And when I grow too old to dream Living in the USA Linda Ronstadt. 1. Back in the U.S.A. 2. When I Grow Too Old to Dream.
  • Linda Ronstadt recorded the song on her album Living in the USA and performed the song on an episode of The Muppet Show. A segment of "When I Grow Too Old to Dream" is used in the chorus of the song "Too Old To Dream" on O'Hooley & Tidow's album Silent June ().
  • Jul 02,  · Linda Ronstadt My Blog is here. arenhatdypenni.pleadincarcurecudicnervlogribotu.co
  • Find album reviews, stream songs, credits and award information for Living in the U.S.A. - Linda Ronstadt on AllMusic - - On Living in the U.S.A., Linda Ronstadt made the.
  • Create your own version of When I Grow Too Old To Dream as made famous by Linda Ronstadt. Choose the instruments you want to hear, and download your version instantly! When I Grow Too Old To Dream - Linda Ronstadt - Custom Backing Track MP3 Living Next Door To Alice. Smokie. £ If You Can't Give Me Love. Suzi Quatro/5(15).
  • When I Grow Too Old to Dream. Linda Ronstadt. From the Album Living In The USA out of 5 stars 3 ratings. Listen Now Buy song $ out of 5 stars When I Grow too Old. " Linda Ronstadt. Reviewed in the United States on September 21, Verified Purchase.5/5(3).
  • Linda Ronstadt. Linda Marie Ronstadt (born July 15, ) is an American popular music recording artist. She has earned eleven Grammy Awards, two Academy of Country Music awards, an Emmy Award, an ALMA Award, numerous United States and internationally certified gold, platinum and multiplatinum albums, in addition to Tony Award and Golden Globe nominations.
  • Linda Ronstadt sang "When I Grow Too Old to Dream" to Kermit on The Muppet Show episode Linda Ronstadt had previously recorded this classic movie song on her album Living in the USA. A clip of the number was used at the climax of the special The Muppets: A Celebration of 30 Years.

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