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Repent Walpurgis (Live)

Walpurgis by any other name Repent Walpurgis is known to many Italian fans as Fortuna (meaning 'fate' or possibly 'good luck'), since that is the title under which it appeared as the B-side of Il Tuo Diamante (an Italian text grafted on to the music of Shine on Brightly).. Fortuna is (on record, though not on the signed sheet-music above) credited to Dossena / Fisher, the 'collaborator' having. Feb 15,  · Song Repent Walpurgis; Artist Procol Harum; Album Procol Harum; Writers Matthew Fisher; Licensed to YouTube by [Merlin] Absolute Label Services; UNIAO BRASILEIRA DE EDITORAS DE MUSICA - UBEM, Public Domain Compositions, LatinAutor - SonyATV, LatinAutor, ASCAP, and 7 Music Rights Societies. Sep 05,  · EDMONTON

On 30 Julythe House of Lords issued a final verdict on the case in Fisher's favour. A lower court had ruled in Fisher's favour ingranting him co-writing credits and a share of the royalties. A higher court partly overturned the ruling ingiving Fisher co-writing credit but no money.

The Court of Appeal had previously held that Fisher had waited too long to bring his claim to court. The House of Lords disagreed, stating there was no time limitation for such claims. Lord David Neuberger of Abbotsbury's opinion stated: "Fisher's subsequent contribution was significant, and, especially the introductory eight bars, an important factor in the work's success Procol Harum's lyricist Keith Reid told Songfacts that the music for "Conquistador" was written before the lyrics.

He added that Repent Walpurgis (Live) was unusual as "99 out of " of the Procol Harum songs, back then, "were written the words first, and then were set to music. Though the album was recorded on multitrackit was issued as mono -only in the UK, and in mono and rechannelled stereo in the US. Despite extensive searching, the original multitrack tapes have not been located and thus a stereo mix of the original ten tracks may never be possible. Several alternate takes, however, have been mixed into stereo and are available on CD.

As recently asthe original single, mixed to stereo, has appeared on a "Dick Bartley Presents: Classic Oldies" compilation on Eric Records. The original North American release included a poster of the album cover. The artwork by Dickinson, the then-girlfriend, and subsequently wife of Keith Reid was heavily influenced by the style of the late-victorian illustrator Aubrey Beardsley [4].

The album has been repackaged and reissued many times. Wondering what authority this like version carried, I dropped Matthew an e-mail asking how closely he had stuck to the Kabitz. I seem to remember having to modify my part so it wouldn't clash with those silly trumpet lines near the beginning. So if these very similar takes are not in fact following an arranger's blueprint, are we to conclude that the 90s Fisher has lost his appetite for extemporisation?

This sticks to the 'traditional' opening, but offers a very pleasing departure in the four bars that answer it; while the score below, representing a San Francisco show, represents possibly the most unusual Walpurgis of all, in which it's the first four bars that vary, almost to unrecognisability: the tune starts an octave higher than usual and abandons the rising contour and rhythmic rigour of all my other examples.

Are there any common elements to be distilled from the examples above? If the Kabitz version is 'wrong' in the composer's eyes, then what constitutes 'right', especially in view of the rich variety of mutations noted above? When I contacted him, Matthew Fisher commented not a propos of this comparative survey, which I had not then mentioned'To be honest I can't remember exactly what I played on any particular version.

I just play whatever I feel like doing at the time. If you can bear any more of these pedantic antics, stay with me and with the above eight performances, as we widen the scope of this very local enquiry to ask what formal global structures Repent Walpurgis appears to exhibit in performance. The most obvious structural feature would seem to be the inclusion of the delicate and academically-accurate piano-episode sandwiched between the two raucous bouts of ensemble improvisation.

Paul Williams in his seminal Crawdaddy! Repent Walpurgis (Live) so Repent Walpurgis. It's not even like the other huge instrumentals Grand FinaleStoke Poges'Albinoni', the Blue Danube that the band has featured, in that it's fundamentally a four-chord trick; its closest Procol parallels blues tracks excepted, of course might be the coda of Pilgrims Progress or the Simple Sister interlude - also sections that derive their effect from local contrast.

But while its Bach has remained, Repent Walpurgis has seen other 'classical' tangents come and go - most consistent has been the Tchaikovsky quotation from the opening of the First Piano Concerto which sellotapes the end of the Bach on to the rest of the ensemble work-out; latterly there's been a rhythmical motif from Beethoven's Fifth Symphony that you can clearly hear on the Utrecht recording starting at 3 minutes 52; there are now even very un-rock scalar passages tumbling down Gary's piano after the Bach.

But these are only grafts on to the structure, like Christian Kabitz's Gounod-like soprano floating over his harping Bach prelude: they are all more-or-less ironic quips, done because they fit, Repent Walpurgis (Live) because the piece is crying out for them.

The tables below show the approximate speeds beats per minute and durations of the versions whose openings were discussed above; they also aim to show how many 'rounds' of the four-chord sequence are played before and after the Bach prelude, and, below that, to give a brief account of the instruments and motifs active during those 'rounds'. To my ears this is the matchless master-version: Robin Trower's modal line wells up and escapes from the churchy backing, his solos are beautifully reasoned, and the Bach presents a plateau of momentary resolution before the harmonic tussle is resumed.

The guitar melodies are singable but not easy to remember, and fitting without seeming predictable; as the far-sighted Paul Williams wrote: ' Repent Walpurgis It will move you, in a rock sense; it will, Repent Walpurgis (Live), in fact, shake you mercilessly, and leave you aching to hear it again.

A comparison of the proportions of the original recording with those of the Fillmore performance, above, confirms the common-sense conclusion that this piece had no fixed length; but those extra couple of rounds after the Bach seem to throw out the proportions of this version, which sounds as if it has lost its way, and lacks that sense of emotional inevitability in the placing of the climax: at the end bombast has triumphed over art.

It sounds exciting, but probably no more moving than Stoke Pogeswhich is certainly not the case with the original recording.

Repent Walpurgis (Live) may, of course, have been very good local reasons for this: I wasn't there, and I don't know exactly what 'fruit and nut' the musicians had been enjoying before the piece started! Gary also sounds unpromisingly off-net in his Central Park introduction - 'We'd like to play this last number for special people and even Matthew wrote it, and we're all going to play it By comparison with the Walpurgis es that Procol took on the road, the original recording set an almost sprightly pace, though in its vinyl context it seemed daringly ponderous at the time.

Here the second half of the tune is even longer that the Easter variant; yet to my ears it never loses interest for a moment. The piece may be 'always our closing number' simply because its impact is hard to follow except with an outright basher like Whisky Train or an aural icon like AWSoP - and it can safely be trotted out even when the Brooker larynx has taken an evening's thrashing: it feels all wrong to encounter it near the start of the Easter Island bootleg, or far from the end of The Symphonic Procol record.

One minute of drum introduction; 2 rounds organ melody very unlike original; 2 rounds organ on two manuals quite like original; 1 round detached chords; 4 rounds Renwick guitar cutting loose; 12 bars Bach with piano and organ and bass prominent; 1 round 'Tchaikovsky'; 1 round solid chords; 2 rounds guitar solo on top; 2 rounds solo with rising scale in bass; 1 round high notes; 79 seconds of chords with drum frills.

The version, above, sounds to me like a hastily-convened, perhaps unpremeditated encore: the lengthy drum introduction perhaps covers other players' unreadiness, and the octave-transposition of Fisher's organ-entry may conceivably have been unintentional. This performance is taken faster than the live 60s versions under discussion, but overall the number is not reverting to its vinyl proportions.

The rising-scale motif has evolved now, and it is found again in the gigantic Utrecht performance, a near-favourite of mine although Geoff Whitehorn's mercurial style is worlds away from the measured Trower original. He is comping chords during the organ extrapolation that are very audible. On the original we hear his arrival only moments before the guitar break. This recording is damn well done production-wise. The mix is right, the placement proper and it just oozes out of the late 60s into my current consciousness with such ease, it is as if it were always there.

The guitar continues to make utterances during the Bach section. This is something I would have mixed out if it were to be the one chosen for release and so it was.

The guitar is far more victorious when it is unexpected. The production allows for a far better view of Matthew's organ sound. It is played using his usual, early percussion teardrop registration. The structure belongs to the group mind. Bob Gaudio was quite a pop writer indeed.

Conclusion: If ever there was a "perfect" track, this may well be it. Then again, as with children or beloved pets, how do you choose a favorite? The final cut for the First Album that was never to be but made it in anyway more or less … a lot less.

Who am I to stand in the way of the stereo version of Repent Walpurgis from the first album even with the edit missing … haha! Which makes it longer?

Browser-resolution willing, here are some Repent Walpurgis openings written out in notation (thanks here to long-time PH fan Linda Clare). Below is the original, clean, simple in its construction, a four-bar phrase starting on tenor G, answered with a balancing melody an octave higher, where a more strident harmonic begins to wail in the. View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the Vinyl release of Live '72 on Discogs. [Ab D G Cm Dm Fm C Am Em Eb B] Chords for Procol Harum - Repent Walpurgis with capo transposer, play along with guitar, piano, ukulele & mandolin.

Jun 08,  · 50+ videos Play all Mix - Procol Harum - Repent Walpurgis (, alternate take, long version, stereo) YouTube Jon Lord & The Hoochie Coochie Men - Green Onions - Duration: bobdaisley , views.

Early performance of Matthew Fisher's classic with the traditional Procol Harum lineup. Recorded at Fillmore West,San Francisco, Ca, in november Note t. Jun 08,  · 50+ videos Play all Mix - Procol Harum - Repent Walpurgis (, alternate take, long version, stereo) YouTube Jon Lord & The Hoochie Coochie Men - Green Onions - Duration: bobdaisley , views.

Now, what exactly does Repent Walpurgis mean, and how is the title related to the early Matthew Fisher tune? As the dictionary states, 'repent' is 'to be sorry for (wrongdoing)', while Walpurgis apparently was the name of some English princess who was spreading the Gospel in Germany some years ago.

Now, what exactly does Repent Walpurgis mean, and how is the title related to the early Matthew Fisher tune? As the dictionary states, 'repent' is 'to be sorry for (wrongdoing)', while Walpurgis apparently was the name of some English princess who was spreading the Gospel in Germany some years ago. Jun 06,  · Stockholm Pre-FM Master is an interesting release. A fifty-five minute tape of this broadcast has been circulating for years, but this new source contains twenty more minutes of the show including “Shine On Brightly”, “In The Wee Small Hours Of Sixpence”, “Repent Walpurgis”, “Look To Your Soul” and “Grand Finale”, all of which have.

Jun 06,  · Stockholm Pre-FM Master is an interesting release. A fifty-five minute tape of this broadcast has been circulating for years, but this new source contains twenty more minutes of the show including “Shine On Brightly”, “In The Wee Small Hours Of Sixpence”, “Repent Walpurgis”, “Look To Your Soul” and “Grand Finale”, all of which have.


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8 Replies to “ Repent Walpurgis (Live) ”

  • 'Repent Walpurgis' is a track from Procol Harum's self-titled first album released in June It was written by Matthew Fisher, who credits Gary Brooker for the idea to add some Bach in the middle (Prelude No 1 in C major from JS Bach's 48 Preludes and Fugues, Book I).
  • Walpurgis by any other name Repent Walpurgis is known to many Italian fans as Fortuna (meaning 'fate' or possibly 'good luck'), since that is the title under which it appeared as the B-side of Il Tuo Diamante (an Italian text grafted on to the music of Shine on Brightly).. Fortuna is (on record, though not on the signed sheet-music above) credited to Dossena / Fisher, the 'collaborator' having.
  • Feb 15,  · Song Repent Walpurgis; Artist Procol Harum; Album Procol Harum; Writers Matthew Fisher; Licensed to YouTube by [Merlin] Absolute Label Services; UNIAO BRASILEIRA DE EDITORAS DE MUSICA - UBEM, Public Domain Compositions, LatinAutor - SonyATV, LatinAutor, ASCAP, and 7 Music Rights Societies.
  • Browser-resolution willing, here are some Repent Walpurgis openings written out in notation (thanks here to long-time PH fan Linda Clare). Below is the original, clean, simple in its construction, a four-bar phrase starting on tenor G, answered with a balancing melody an octave higher, where a more strident harmonic begins to wail in the.
  • [Ab D G Cm Dm Fm C Am Em Eb B] Chords for Procol Harum - Repent Walpurgis with capo transposer, play along with guitar, piano, ukulele & mandolin.
  • Early performance of Matthew Fisher's classic with the traditional Procol Harum lineup. Recorded at Fillmore West,San Francisco, Ca, in november Note t.

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