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La Douzième - Various - Hazardous Beat Treatment (File, MP3)

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But he was appointed, because at that time they didn't elect school board members; they were all appointed. Do you remember when they started to elect? No; I don 1 t know that. I know that back in the early 's he was appointed, and the other members were appointed, too, so it must have been sometime afteranyway, that they elected school board members.

Now, you said that things were never the same after the riot. No, they weren't because--! But, one of the reasons why they destroyed Loper's Restaurant was because he didn't mind serving blacks. And my mother said [that] before the riot they could eat anyplace. Then you couldn't go anyplace.

Afterwards they moved on the corner of Sixth and Monroe where Coe's bookstore is now--it's someone else's name but it was Coe's. Haines [and Essick's]. And every Sunday I would go to Sunday school. It only cost a nickel.

And every Sunday after Sunday school, Maimi Stewart, then--she is now, Donnegan,--and another little girl and I would go down Sixth Street to Clarkson's Drugstore and get always got a chocolate ice cream soda. But it was the only place in Margaret Ferguson town, where a black person could get an ice cream soda. And that was after the riot.

That was along aboutI guess, or someplace like that. What about the theaters, could. No, before the riot you could go. After that they had segregated places for you, usually in the balcony.

My father took me to see "Uncle Tom's Cabin" at the old Chatterton Opera House, and we sat up in the balcony on the left side. And the only time that we sat downstairs, in my younger days that I can remember, at Chatterton's, was one time when Burt Williams was here, and his company.

I don't know whether they had one night for blacks, or how it was, but I remember that we sat down in the dress circle and. And this was who, Burt Williams? Burt Williams. I was so small I can't remember much, but he--you have heard of Burt Williams, I know.

He was a very noted comedian, and so very capable that he could just stick his hand out clothed in a white glove, out of the curtain, and people would laugh, you know. And my folk took me to see Burt Williams because they felt that this was something that I should know, and we did sit downstairs in Chatterton's Opera House.

And everybody was so excited, because they had little places on the back of the seat where you could put in La Douzième - Various - Hazardous Beat Treatment (File coin and get a little box of chocolates. And I thought this was the most marvelous thing that I ever saw in my life!

And they didn't have that upstairs, of course? No, no, no, MP3). That was downstairs. But I don't remember ever at any other time being downstairs in a theater until my cousin, John and the NAACP sued them all here and opened up theaters for them. But this all happened after the riot. Now, for the riot itself, I know you were quite young. Is there anything you know about it or heard them say about it?

Oh yes. My Aunt Sal had a restaurant downtown on Washington Street between Eighth and Ninth, and she had an apartment upstairs over the restaurant and she lived there.

And she called--and now, this is, I can only tell you what my mother said. I can remember just one or two things about it myself; I was alive and here, but. And next door to us lived the Wilsons, and as I told you, Mr. Wil-son's wife was my grandmother's sister. I have some pictures of her here. There she is. Many people thought she was white, and because they thought she was 8 Margaret Ferguson 9 white, they felt that Mr.

Wilson was married to a white woman. And that was a time when they were being very angry about all the black men married to white women here in town. Matter of fact, that's why [William] Donnegan was hung, because he had a white wife. And so they were going to come out to get Mr. And things were going so hard that he got up on top of a building, and he had to stay there all night because the bullets were whizzing around so he couldn't get off.

Is that right? But the next morning, someway, early in the morning, I guess before daybreak, he did get back home. And they had a large cistern in their backyard, which was just between the house and the fence, and it was boarded over.

You had to walk across the cistern to get around the house if you came around the house. He took all the boards off the top of this big cistern, and then he got him a shotgun. He said he was going to sit on the other side of that cistern, and if they came out there after him, he was going to sit over there on the other side with his shotgun and they would fall in the cistern laughs when they came around the house. But they never did come. But my own father was an extremely fair man, too.

A picture of your father. We had neighbors across worked in the coal mines. And we some of which I have many of now. My mother was so afraid that we would have trouble--and she didn't want all this lovely Havelind and everything to be destroyed--that the English people across the street said that if we could put it in a big wash basket that they'd take it over to their house.

So we got one of these big wicker wash baskets, and she packed all this lovely stuff in there. Some people who worked at the mine with Mr. Farnsworth saw us taking it over there. So when Mr. Farnsworth came to work, they told him that if he didn't bring it back, they were going to burn his house down. That's my, father's sister and her younger daughter. There's quite a little story about that. All right. So did you have to. I wouldn't want to lose that; it's the only one I have.

No, well, I'd better--yes. Anyway, they brought the basket of china back. Joseph's home is now. That's on the old Dana Lawrence property which was Mr. Brown's farm, he rented it. At that time that was quite a ways out of town, because the city limits was a long ways from there. So many, many, many of us went out there and stayed. I was out there until--a week, at least, until everything calmed down in town. But my mother was so frightened about our house, because my father worked for the state--he worked for the state for forty' two years--and some of the.

They let him stay over there in the office for a few of the nights, so our house was really unprotected, you see. She wanted to come in and see about her house, so Mr.

And as they drove down Eleventh Street, some of the people came to the door and hollered, "We're going to get you tonight; we're going to get you tonight. So my mother was so scared.

When she got home, she called my father at the statehouse; he went up to the adjutant general, who was head of the National Guard there, with rifles and all around. They didn't come, and we never had any more threats from anyone in the neighborhood. And these were neighbors talking like that?

Well, they were some people about four or five blocks down Eleventh Street. My mother didn't know who they were. They were not our immediate neighbors, because our immediate neighbors had been our neighbors as long as we had been there.

The neighbor right across the street was a German family named Chrisman, and they had come to their place about the same time that my grandfather had back in They had a large vineyard and a truck garden like they had in Germany; it was from Eleventh Street back to Thirteenth Street on Ash Street and up to what is now Oak Street, and that was all in truck garden and vineyards.

That's the way they made their living. Their name was Chrisman. And I say, the people across the street the other way were English and they worked in the mines with my uncle. They were trying to help us. This is south of Ash? You see, all that area in there that's Harvard Park, my grandfather farmed. He rented it, and he farmed it. And then it was made into a development sometime before he died, and named Harvard Park.

Everything Margaret Ferguson in there was named. This clause. So many of the people who moved into some of these houses that were being built down there knew that that clause was in their deed, and so they were very anti-black, you see? This is a very interesting--you can buy in Harvard Park now. Who wants to? But when Harvard Park was first established, it was right across the street from us, and we had been living there a hundred years, but there were clauses in all those deeds that not a lot could be sold for blacks.

And the reason for it, I guess, was because we were living there and the Hustons were living--where the Paris Cleaners are now was the Huston home. Margaret Pendergrass' grandfather. They owned a big farm out here on, I guess you'd call it Adloff Lane now, where the Gaines are.

Where the old Gaines place is, right next to it was the Huston farm. And knowing that we were so close, I guess they were afraid that maybe more would try to come out there. In fact, one black woman did get a house. But she had a house on the Iorner of Ninth and Ash, and that's right across from the Allis-Chalmers place now. And they burned her house. Her name was Jessie McClain, and she lived--she had lived there--well, she moved there when I was a little girl.

And after she had been there for several years, they burned her house. And she just lived on the corner of Ninth and Ash. But they were. But there was a great deal of prejudice here in property owning. Now that we're moving into all sections of the city, you don't think so much about it.

But I know the time when it was very difficult to buy in certain places. And we had lived on that corner, as I said, sincewhich was a long time before the riot, thirty years before the riot. Now, when your mother came in with this wagon that she had borrowed, did she try to come back in before you all moved back? Oh yes, she went back that night. No, I mean, she went back out to Dana-Lawrence.

Out to Brown's farm. Yes, Brown's farm, but did she come back in A. The land was owned by Mrs. Dana Lawrence. You know on Fourth and I guess it's Lawrence Avenue?

One of the lovely pieces of his architecture that's in existence. And she was a Dana, and she married a man named Lawrence and this was Mrs. Dana Lawrence's farm that Brown rented, see. Quite a large farm. And Brown, of course, was colored. His daughter married my uncle. We took refuge out there.

See, many things happened here during the riot. Now, we were out from town a long ways, but Colonel [Otis] Duncan and John Slaughter artd them, they lived up there in the packet where the riot was. Union Baptist Church was on the corner of Twelfth and Mason. That's why I say you should interview Mrs.

Rollins, because she lived just next door to the old Union Baptist Church, and that was the area where many, many, many blacks lived. John's Church was on Fifteenth and Mason or somewhere, and the riot concentrated in that area. And he had a saber--you see, he belonged to the 8th Regiment. See, the 8th Regiment's home was in Chicago, but they had companies all over Illinois, and Company I was the company here in Springfield, These were black companies and the 8th Regiment was a black regiment.

Otis Duncan was a captain in Company I. At that time; he later became a full colonel. He was a captain in Company I of the 8th Regiment, and he had a saber. When they had their dress parades in the evening, they wore blue uniforms, and they wore swords.

I remember that from the time I was a little girl. When the mob broke in his house, they took this saber off the wall and gouged the eyes out of his mother's picture. So that was where they concentrated; That's one thing--when the people talk about the Humphreys here. There was a white huckster whose name--I only knew him as Slim Humphrey; he Margaret Ferguson probably has another name but they called him Slim Humphrey.

They were really his stock in trade. And I know he came to our house many times. Where blacks lived. Is he related to this Humphrey Market?

Yes, that have the market down here on Fifteenth Street. Of course, I don't blame these Humphreys because they are the younger ones. But 13 I don't really buy anything from Humphreys, and that's one of the reasons why I don't. Because I remember, way back when I was a little girl, the Slim Humphrey, who was a huckster and came to our house often to sell my mother vegetables and fruit, was one of the main leaders in the riot.

Because many white people didn't even know where Negroes lived, and particularly not the ones that they wanted to harm or hurt. See, the people that they harmed and hurt were not really the no-gooders.

The Donnegan that they hung was a very nice man. And Otis Duncan worked for the secretary of education--whoever, the director I guess you'd call him then--and had for years. He had a very good state job. And he was a man of importance, so they were very busy hurting some of the Negroes who Q. Some of the prominent ones. The prominent ones. And so, of course we were frightened, you see. Because we, also, were affluent; we owned property. Many poor whites didn't, because this town was filled with what we used to call bohunks.

They were the immigrants from Lithuania and Estonia and places like that, that came here to work in the mines. They made more money than they'd ever made in their lifetime. And they all lived out here in this southeast part of town, and of course there was a great deal of animosity toward any well-established Negro who owned his own house and had a good job and worked for the state when some of them couldn't.

I remember when one of the families moved in my neighborhood--and I have often given this as an example of how they can rise. He was a young Lithuanian--or he may not have been a Lithuanian, but he was something anyway from--he was a Scandinavian of some kind. And he came here to work in the mines. And American girls didn't want him. He didn't speak good English; he was a miner; he was a bohunk. That's what they called all of them, bohunks. And he wanted to get married, and there was a family out here in the southeast, what we called gypsies, really.

And he married one of those girls. But he didn't want to live with them because he came from a country where people were industrious, and so he bought a little house in the middle of our block. On one side of him was my Aunt Liz of the Wilson family, and us.

And on the other side of that little house there was a house that belonged to a Matilda Wilson, who was black, and two lots above that that belonged to Margaret Ferguson the Hustons. And in the middle of that black block, he bought a little house. He didn't mind where he was; probably was the only place he could buy because of his background. And they had two children. But that little house bloomed. The yard, he kept the yard beautiful; they had a lovely garden.

And he wouldn't have anything to do with his wife's folk, the gypsies. They could only come there when he wasn't there. The girl became a secretary to a lawyer. They bought in the neighborhood, and they had two children.

But finally the boy, her husband, became so good in his work that Allis-Chalmers sent him up to Milwaukee and had him trained some more. And he came back and he got a promotion. Then they got too good for the neighborhood, so they moved out on South Seventh Street, oh, around the block or someplace out there. And their children went through school here, and then they sent them to college. One of the boys is a Ph.

How they have come up: Now, I know that they came from a gypsy mother who lived in a trailer, laughs you might say, and an immigrant father. And they gradually have come up until now in that family there are Ph. But what an opportunity they had. Just with more difficulty. But they found it more difficult. But I often give this as an example, because I watched this from the early times and I know where they are now.

So, it's very interesting. Did your people--your parents or anyone--give any number or did anybody know about approximately how many people got killed in the riot? But I have often heard it said that they buried them by the bushels, and it didn't get in the papers. Because, they attacked this business block on Washington Street--see, the Negroes had all kinds of businesses in that. They had barber shops and they had restaurants, and they had second-hand stores, and they had--!

The only piece of white business in that block was a drugstore on the northeast corner of Eighth and Washington, and Margaret Ferguson that was a white drugstore for years and years and La Douzième - Various - Hazardous Beat Treatment (File and years, but everything else was black.

And these Negroes went up on the top of the buildings, and they were armed. I don't know where they got the arms, but they had them.

And as the crowd went down the street, they shot into the crowd from the top of the buildings, and they killed a great many white people. I think more whites were killed than the black, than Negroes were killed. Oh yes, this is reported from all the reports that I have had. In fact, there were--away from Mr. Donnegan, :there- was a man' by itJ:he name of Scott who they claim was killed, but so far from the report that I've been given, there weren't too many blacks that got killed.

No, because the blacks did defend themselves, and they did it very well, And, of course, there was a lot of property destruction up in this section that I spoke about before. And then after it was over there was a lot of animosity, name calling and things of that sort.

Even my father, who was so white you couldn't tell him from anything--he was so white he was pink--had names called to him as he walked down the street once or twice downtown, people that knew that he was black.

And everything changed as far as theater seating was concerned, and as far as eating in restaurants was concerned, and in many things like that. And it became an unpleasant place. What about job opportunity? Was there any adverse effect on job opportunity?

Well now, this is something I don't know. One of the things that interested me when I was doing this paper, I compared--! One woman had a fish bait business out here on West Jefferson Street, laughs and she was fascinating. She had a great big place out in her backyard where she raised the worms, and fed them coffee grounds; and she had different kinds of minnows and night crawlers that she'd put coal in the tanks. I interviewed blacks who were in business, and were doing things.

But I went back in the city directories to find out what they were doing before, in the early 's. Because in the early directories-it was behind your name, whether you were black or white, see? And if you go to the library and go through the city directories, you'll find out. And they were doing lots of things. Everything here was built out of bricks; all our streets were paved with bricks, everything.

And it was made here in Springfield. And Negroes drove all these brick wagons, because that was hard work. They had flat bottom wagons hauled by a team of horses, and they all owned their own teams and their own wagons.

They had to load these bricks, and then they had to unload them where they went; and this was hard work. And practically every brick hauler in town was colored. And you'd see them go down the street and it'd be five and six wagons at a time.

They went in a stream, you know, hauling Margaret Ferguson bricks. Well, that didn't change, because whites weren't going to do that work, anyway. Negroes were hired in the mines along with the immigrants. That didn't change; people still worked in the mines. One of the most elite jobs you could have here was to work in the statehouse; and if you had a job in the statehouse, you really had it made.

But you couldn't be anything except a messenger or a janitor. You see, you didn't get higher jobs. My father was a messenger for years until the State Department of Health had these exhibits they sent all over the state--the breathing doll, and the tuberculosis, and this MP3) that--and then my father became custodian and exhibitor for that and then he did that. Wherever they had a baby show or this or that, he took it around.

So, if you had a job with the state, you were very well off, indeed. And if you were lucky enough to work for Mr. Maldaner on the side, you were really lucky because Maldaners had a catering business here, a very, very successful catering business. If the governor of Illinois had a party, he called Maldaners, and Maldaners served it. If you served a reception at the mansion, you had on a tuxedo or you had on a cutaway or a full dress suit.

And so, my father was one of these lucky guys. This is where you made your extra money. You worked for Maldaner, and you served all the big parties and all the big receptions. And I remember, up until just a few years ago, I had a program signed by President Taft; it was stolen from me while my mother was ill. My father awaited a banquet that was given for President Taft when he was here, and [Charles] Deneen was governor.

They all autographed this program, and I had President Taft's signature, and Governor Deneen's, and several other people. And when you worked those banquets, they always passed a plate for tips at the end. Everybody around put in, and the fellows got their tips, you see. So you not only got paid your five dollars for working for Maldaner, but you got the tips, so that that helped out your income. Because you only made a hundred dollars a month; that was an enormous salary.

And so during the Depression, we never really felt the Depression very much, because my father still was working. And a hundred dollars a month during the Depression was an enormous salary. So, if you got a job working for the state, you were somebody. Now, where was Maldaner located at the time? Right where he's located now. They have a Maldaner's Restaurant downtown now on Sixth Street between Adams and Monroe, on the east side of the street, and that's where he was then.

But unfortunately, his folk--his children--did not inherit his business. Well, the old man, his son inherited it, but his grandsons didn't. It was sold to one of Margaret Ferguson 17 the men that was one of his supervisors.

What effect, if any, did the riot have on school? Well, I don't know that it had any. I don't remember any difference between me and any of the other children in the school.

Now, one thing I found out when I was doing this paper was that the reason why we had separate schools in the southern part of the state and not in the northern part of the state was that the first six governors of Illinois were Southerners. See, Southern people migrated to the southern part of Illinois, but the northern part of Illinois was settled by immigrants.

And so the first six governors were Southern men, and they had all of the Southern influence in the southern part of the state, and you had separate schools. But beginning in the middle part of the state, you didn't. And as far as I know, there has never been separate schools in Springfield. I have pictures of my mother, somewhere, when she was in school in a little school right across from Iles School where Slaughters live now.

There used to be a little school on that corner. Later it became a Catholic church for immigrant Catholics, but they tore it down and built that house for the Catholic priest where they tore the little school down. But there's never been separate schools here. But they have become separate because of the housing situation.

And as pe? And the same way with Lincotn School. But I remember when the old Curry home was a community center--a great big old three-stoty white brick house which had, in early days, been the Curry home. And there were many other grand houses in thert, and very wealthy white people lived in that area.

And for years aftet they were gone, Monroe Street from Eleventh to Fifteenth was white, with just a few Negro families. So Lincoln School was not always a black School and they had the auditoriums. And we could get that very well because there were more Negroes in that neighborhood, and more blacks went there. The Masonics owned a building there; and when they had this urban development Where Horace Mann [Plaza] is now, it was sold. And the Krell's Hardware store around on Jefferson Street, the same way.

They wouldn't take the small amount. But the Masons didn't fight back; they took that little tiny bit of money, and it wasn't enough to have to move from there. But I remember well whenthe Masonic Hall was a place that ypu had dances. That was after the riot; before the riot, you could1 have dances in any of the halls downtown. And they had--I mean, from what I understand; my mother has spoken many times of the various!

But you know, we used to have a red light district here. And some of the houses spilled over onto Mason Street between Ninth and Tenth. Well, we were just kids; we used to hang out the back window off the stage, looking into the back doots laughter of the houses on Seventh Street, trying to see if we could see anything, laughter which we couldn't. But we knew what they were.

Is that right. What about Iles School? Now, that was almost a white school? Attd the others went to Feitshan School, which was an elementary school; it wasn't a junior high school. And then when I was about in the eighth grade, they decided to have junior high schools here. And there were only two Negroes in the whole school, Marne Donnegan Stewart and me. Margaret Ferguson A. And so that's where the line came, on the east side of Eleventh Street, and I lived on the east side of Eleventh Street.

Is this Mame Donnegan Stewart any relation to Mr. Donnegan that got killed? I presume so, because she was a Donnegan. She lives up there in the--she doesn't live in the high rise on Thirteenth Street, but one of those cottages. You MP3), the high rise has--she lives in one of those cottages. She works for Barkers if she hasn't retired. She may be retired now; she worked for [S. But when I went to Iles School, I would say maybe a fourth of us were black and three-fourths of us were white.

But I say, as the neighborhood became black, then the school--it's blacker now though, I think, than it's ever been. Yes, definitely. Because the neighborhood has become blacker and blacker--and farther south, has gone farther south.

Junior High School. Junior High. Then I went to Springfield. Springfield High. I never had any difficulty in school of any kind.

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